ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LAW AND INSTITUTIONS (LAW AND ECONOMICS)

Course Information
TitleLAW AND ECONOMICS / ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LAW AND INSTITUTIONS (LAW AND ECONOMICS)
CodeΕΡ066
FacultyLaw
SchoolLaw
Cycle / Level1st / Undergraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CoordinatorAspasia Tsaoussi
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID100001322

Programme of Study: UPS School of Law (2015-today)

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
Unified OrientationExchangeSpring-5

Class Information
Academic Year2018 – 2019
Class PeriodSpring
Faculty Instructors
Weekly Hours2
Class ID
600127110
Type of the Course
  • General Knowledge
Course Category
General Foundation
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Digital Course Content
Erasmus
The course is also offered to exchange programme students.
Language of Instruction
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Learning Outcomes
After following this course, the Erasmus law students should be able to: * Better understand how the market works and how it interacts with the legal system * Improve their legal skills by learning to predict the consequences of human behavior and analyze legal problems with greater efficiency * Apply basic economic concepts (like incentives and opportunity cost) to their written legal work and their oral argumentation as law practitioners * Identify the inherent logic of legal rules and thus acquire a more realistic sense of the legal system
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Retrieve, analyse and synthesise data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Make decisions
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Work in an interdisciplinary team
  • Generate new research ideas
  • Appreciate diversity and multiculturality
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
Law and economics is one of the fastest-growing areas of applied microeconomics. It uses the standard microeconomic tools and concepts of scarcity, choice, preferences, incentives, supply and demand to explain legal and political rules, social conventions and norms, firms and contracts, government organizations, and other institutions. Our perspective will be that of the lawyer, viewing these institutions under the lens of purposeful human choice. The economic approach to the Law has both predictive and prescriptive functions. Law schools around the world are devoting increasing attention to understanding economic analysis of legal institutions. The course will give special emphasis to contract law, tort law, criminal law and family law applications of economic analysis. It will also examine the complex relationship between economic efficiency and social justice and discuss the importance of social norms.
Keywords
Law and Economics, Economic Analysis of Law
Educational Material Types
  • Notes
  • Slide presentations
  • Book
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures
Reading Assigment
Total
Student Assessment
Student Assessment methods
  • Oral Exams (Formative, Summative)
Bibliography
Course Bibliography (Eudoxus)
- Teaching notes in the form of handouts (authored by the professor) - Excerpts from "suggested bibliography" (see below)
Additional bibliography for study
• Robert Cooter & Thomas Ulen, Law and Economics (Prentice-Hall: 6th ed. 2011) • Boudewijn Bouckaert & Gerrit De Geest (eds.), Encyclopedia of Law & Economics (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 5 vols. 2000) • Aristides N. Hatzis, ed., Economic Analysis of Law: A European Perspective (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar 2013) • Aristides N. Hatzis, ed., Norms and Values in Law and Economics (The Economics of Legal Relationships) (London: Routledge 2012) • Richard A. Posner, Economic Analysis of Law (Austin, TX: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business/Aspen Publishers, 8th ed. 2010) • Hans-Bernd Schäfer and Claus Ott, The Economic Analysis of Civil Law (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar 2004) • Steven Shavell, Foundations of Economic Analysis of Law (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press 2004) • Aspasia Tsaoussis, “Protecting Homemakers’ Marriage-Specific Investments under No-Fault Divorce: A Model for Restructuring Alimony in Civil-Law Countries”, American Law & Economics Review 6: 217-247 (2004) • Aspasia Tsaoussis and Eleni Zervogianni, “Judges as Satisficers: A Law and Economics Perspective on Judicial Liability”, European Journal of Law and Economics 29: 333-357 (2010) • Aspasia Tsaoussis-Hatzis, The Greek Divorce Law Reform of 1983 and Its Impact on Homemakers: A Social and Economic Analysis (Athens-Komotini: Ant. N. Sakkoulas Publishers 2003) (foreword: Richard Posner)
Last Update
07-09-2017