Greek Historiography

Course Information
TitleΑρχαία Ελληνική Ιστοριογραφία / Greek Historiography
CodeΙΑΕ 702
FacultyPhilosophy
SchoolHistory and Archaeology
Cycle / Level2nd / Postgraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID600015971

Programme of Study: Historical Research

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
Archaías Ellīnikīs kai Rōmaïkīs IstoríasElective CoursesWinter/Spring-15

Class Information
Academic Year2018 – 2019
Class PeriodWinter
Faculty Instructors
Class ID
600127539
Course Type 2011-2015
Specific Foundation / Core
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Digital Course Content
Language of Instruction
  • Greek (Instruction, Examination)
Learning Outcomes
Students who attend the course are expected to come in contact with the Greek historians of the Classical and Hellenistic period • Get to know the key features of each historiographer's work. • Understand the process that led to the need to record the events. • be familiar with the methodological and practical issues that may arise from the researcher's involvement in the field he is studying • Practice the oral and written presentation of their ideas / arguments
General Competences
  • Work autonomously
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
From the 6th c. B.C. onwards, a "scientific" historiography began, with representatives such as Hecataeus, Herodotus and Thucydides, based on the need to search for truth through the critical analysis and personal awareness of the author. However, it should not be overlooked that in this new context, despite the improvement of the knowledge provided by the intellectuals to the general public, the attachment to mythological past and traditions has not completely disappeared, and in some cases it is also detected the invention of new myths. Then Xenophon was mainly interested in the events of the years 411-362 in Greece itself, and especially in the Peloponnese, and Diodorus from Sicily and Polybius later took over. The seminar sets out to describe Greek historiography from the aftermath of the Persian Wars in 478 to the end of the 1st c. BC. Course Weekly Schedule Week 1: General Introduction. Myth and oral tradition. Week 2: Hecataeus. Discussion of selected sources. Week 3: Herodotus. Discussion of selected sources. Week 4: Herodotus. Discussion of selected sources. Week 5: Thucydides. History and reason. Discussion of selected sources. Week 6: Thucydides. Discussion of selected sources. Week 7: Xenophon. Discussion of selected sources. Week 8: Ephorus, Theopompus. Discussion of selected sources. Week 9: Diodorus from Sicily. Discussion of selected sources. 10th week: Polybius. Discussion of selected sources. 11th week: Polybius. Discussion of selected sources. 12th week: Minor historians and fragments. Discussion of selected sources. Week 13: General overview.
Keywords
Myth, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus, Polybius, Historiography
Educational Material Types
  • Selected bibliography
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Communication with Students
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures391.3
Seminars1344.5
Reading Assigment1525.1
Written assigments1254.2
Total45015
Student Assessment
Description
Students will have to study weekly specific book chapters, articles and primary sources, and present, orally or in written, brief reports of their critical reading. Students' evaluation will depend on their weekly presentations, their ability to argue and to answer complicated questions based on bibliography and the relevant sources, and on their final essay for the course.
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Exam with Multiple Choice Questions (Formative, Summative)
  • Oral Exams (Formative)
Bibliography
Additional bibliography for study
H.C. Baldry, The Unity of Mankind in Greek Thought. Cambridge 1965. R. Bichler-R. Rollinger, Herodot, Darmdtadt 2000. L. Bertelli, ‘Hecataeus: From Genaelogy to Historiography’, στο N. Luraghi (εκδ.), The Historian's Craft in the Age of Herodotus, Oxford 2001, 67-94. J.B. Bury, Ancient Greek Historians, Dover Publications, London 1909 (ελλ. μτφ. 19842). E.R. Dodds, The Greeks and the Irrational, Berkeley 1951 [ελλ. μτφ. Οι Έλληνες και το παράλογο, Αθήνα 1977]. K. Dowden, The Uses of Greek Mythology, London-NewYork 1992. D. Fehling, Herodotus and his Sources: Citation, Invention and Narrative Art, tr. J. Howie, Liverpool 1989. M. Finley, The Use and Abuse of History, London 1971. R. L. Fowler, ‘Herodotos and his contemporaries’, JHS 116 (1996), 62-87. R. L. Fowler, ‘Early Historie and Literacy’, στο N. Luraghi (εκδ.), The Historian's Craft in the Age of Herodotus, Oxford, 2001, 95-115. R. L. Fox, ‘Theopompos of Chios and the Greek World’, 411-322 BC’, J. Boardman-C.E. Vaphopoulou-Richardson (εκδ.), Chios. A Conference at the Homereion in Chios, Oxford 1984, 105-120. K. von Fritz, ‘Herodotus and the growth of Greek Historiography’, TAPhA 67 (1936), 315-340. H.-J. Gehrke, ‘Myth, history and collective identity: uses of the past in Ancient Greece and beyond’, στο N. Luraghi (εκδ.), The Historian's Craft in the Age of Herodotus, Oxford 2001, 286-313. R. L. Fox, ‘Theopompos of Chios and the Greek World’, 411-322 BC’, J. Boardman-C.E. Vaphopoulou-Richardson (εκδ.), Chios. A Conference at the Homereion in Chios, Oxford 1984, 105-120. K. von Fritz, ‘Herodotus and the growth of Greek Historiography’, TAPhA 67 (1936), 315-340. H.-J. Gehrke, ‘Myth, history and collective identity: uses of the past in Ancient Greece and beyond’, στο N. Luraghi (εκδ.), The Historian's Craft in the Age of Herodotus, Oxford 2001, 286-313. Gomme 1956 A.W. Gomme, A Historical Commentary on Thucydides, vol. II, Books II-III, Oxford, 1956. Gomme 1966 A.W. Gomme, A Historical Commentary on Thucydides, vol. III, Books IV-V24, Oxford, 1966. Gomme-Andrewes-Dover 1970 A.W. Gomme-A. Andrewes-K.J. Dover, A Historical Commentary on Thucydides, vol. IV, Books V25-VII, Oxford, 1970. J. Gould, Herodotus, London 1989. F. Hartog, The Mirror of Herodotus. The Representation of the Other in the Writing of History (tr. J. Lloyd), Berkeley-Los Angeles, 1988. W. A. Heidel, ‘Hecataeus and Xenophanes’, AJPh 64 (1943), 257-277. S. Hornblower, A Commentary on Thucydides, vol. I, Oxford, 1991. S. Hornblower (εκδ.), Greek Historiography, Oxford 1994. S. Hornblower, A Commentary on Thucydides, vol. II, Oxford, 1996. W.W. How-J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, vols. I-II, Oxford 1912. F. Jacoby, Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker, 2. Teil, BD: Kommentar zu Nr. 106-153, Berlin 1927. Jacoby 1949 F. Jacoby, Atthis: The Local Chronicles of Ancient Athens, Oxford 1949. F. Jacoby, Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker, 3. Teil, b (Supplement), v. I, Text, Leiden 1954. F. Jacoby, Griechische Historiker, Stuttgart 1956. F. Jacoby, Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker, 1. Teil, a: Kommentar, Nachträge, Leiden 1957. O. Lendle, Kommentar zu Xenophons Anabasis, Bücher 1-7, Darmstadt 1995. A. Lesky, Geschichte der griechischen Literatur, München 1971 (ελλ. μτφ. Ιστορία της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής Λογοτεχνίας, Θεσσαλονίκη 19853) N. Luraghi (εκδ.), The Historian's Craft in the Age of Herodotus, Oxford, 2001 J. Marincola, Greek Historians: Greece and Rome. New Surveys in the Classics No 31. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. K. Meister, Die griechische Geschichtsschreibung. Von den Anfängen bis zum Ende des Hellenismus. Stuttgart-Berlin-Köln: W. Kohlhammer Verlag, 1990. Meyer E., Theopomps Hellenika, Hildesheim 1909 (ανατ. 1966). A. Momigliano, Studies in Historiography, London 1966. A. Momigliano, ‘The Historians of the Classical World and Their Audiences: some Suggestions’, ASNP 8, 1 (1978) 59-75. L. Pearson, The Early Ionian Historians, Oxford 1939. L. Pearson, Local Historians of Attica, Philadelphia 1942. Perlman 1984 P.J. Perlman, The Thearodokia in the Peloponnese (διδ. Διατρ.), California 1984. Plezia 1960 M. Plezia, ‘Hekataios über die Völker am Nordrand des skythischen Schwartzmeer-gebietes’, Eos 50 (1959-1960), 27-42. Powell 1935 J.E. Powell, ‘Notes on Herodotus’, CQ 29 (1935), 72-82, 150-163. Pritchett 1993 W. K. Pritchett, The Liar school of Herodotus, Amsterdam 1993. J. Redfield, ‘Herodotus the Tourist’, CP 80 (1985), 97-118 [αναδημοσιευμένο στο T. Harrison (εκδ.), Greeks and Barbarians, Edinburgh, 2002, 24-49. Jan P. Stronk, The Ten Thousand in Thrace, Gieben, Amsterdam 1995. R. Thomas, Herodotus in Context. Ethnography, Science and the Art of Persuasion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. J.-P. Vernant, Myth et pensée en Grèce ancienne, Paris 1965 [ελλ. μτφ. Μύθος και σκέψη στην αρχαία Ελλάδα, Αθήνα 1989] F.W. Walbank, A Historical Commentary on Polybius, Οξφόρδη I 1957, II 1967, III 1979. S. West, ‘Herodotus’portrait of Hecataeus’, JHS 111 (1991), 144-160. W. Will, ‘Die griechische Geschicht-schreibung des 4. Jahrhunderts: eine Zusammenfassung’, στο J.M. Alonso-Nunez (εκδ.), Geschichtsbild und Geschichtsdenken im Altertum, Darmstadt 1991, 113-135.
Last Update
26-09-2018