Management of Educational Units and Total Quality Management at School

Course Information
TitleΔιοίκηση Εκπαιδευτικών Μονάδων και Διοίκηση Ολικής Ποιότητας στο Σχολείο / Management of Educational Units and Total Quality Management at School
CodeΥ.009
FacultyEducation
SchoolEarly Childhood Education
Cycle / Level1st / Undergraduate, 2nd / Postgraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CoordinatorDimitrios Zachos
CommonYes
StatusActive
Course ID600017425

Programme of Study: PMS DIA VIOU MATHĪSĪ KAI ĪGESIA STĪN EKPAIDEUSĪ-EPISTĪMES TĪS AGŌGĪ (2019-2020)

Registered students: 21
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
KORMOSCompulsory Course3210

Programme of Study: PMS "DIA VIOU MATHĪSĪ KAI ĪGESIA STĪN EKPAIDEUSĪ-EPISTĪMES TĪS AGŌGĪS" (2019 EŌS 2019)

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
KORMOSCompulsory Course3210

Class Information
Academic Year2020 – 2021
Class PeriodWinter
Faculty Instructors
Weekly Hours3
Class ID
600179364
Course Category
Specific Foundation / Core
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
  • Distance learning
Erasmus
The course is also offered to exchange programme students.
Language of Instruction
  • Greek (Instruction, Examination)
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Learning Outcomes
he aim of the unit is to contribute to a better and more socially just future for education. To fulfill it, students are provided with theories and experiences that will help them understand the complexity of management issues and their impact on education, which are essential for the success of educational change. After the end of the module, students are expected to: A. Knowledge & Understanding 1. To be familiar with the problem that concerns the administration of education. Have mastered that body of knowledge that will enable them to handle the main concepts and themes of the relevant academic production. 2. To engage critically with the best quality Greek and international educational research on educational leadership 3. Be aware of recent developments in education policy, which relate to the way educational organizations are run and especially school units. 4. To obtain the equipment that will enable them to analyze educational policies in the light of equality and social justice, as well as to recognize the practical issues related to leadership in education. 5. To obtain the supplies that will enable them to recognize the ideological origin, as well as to analyze and interpret the different proposals for education submitted to the public sphere (Mass Media), to the declarations of the parties, in the legislation Mrs. 6. To obtain the supplies that will enable them to critique the approaches / views concerning leadership in education. 7. To acquire basic research knowledge and skills (time management, teamwork, analysis, synthesis and summary of data, presentation techniques). 8. To acquire the supplies to carry out a research, to write it & to present it. 9. Provide them with a solid foundation for higher education, ie for doctoral dissertations in this scientific area. The aim of the unit is to contribute to a better and more socially just future for education. To fulfill it, students are provided with theories and experiences that will help them understand the complexity of management issues and their impact on education, which are essential for the success of educational change. After the end of the module, students are expected to: A. Knowledge & Understanding 1. To be familiar with the problem that concerns the administration of education. Have mastered that body of knowledge that will enable them to handle the main concepts and themes of the relevant academic production. 2. To engage critically with the best quality Greek and international educational research on educational leadership 3. Be aware of recent developments in education policy, which relate to the way educational organizations are run and especially school units. 4. To obtain the equipment that will enable them to analyze educational policies in the light of equality and social justice, as well as to recognize the practical issues related to leadership in education. 5. To obtain the supplies that will enable them to recognize the ideological origin, as well as to analyze and interpret the different proposals for education submitted to the public sphere (Mass Media), to the declarations of the parties, in the legislation Mrs. 6. To obtain the supplies that will enable them to critique the approaches / views concerning leadership in education. 7. To acquire basic research knowledge and skills (time management, teamwork, analysis, synthesis and summary of data, presentation techniques). 8. To acquire the supplies to carry out a research, to write it & to present it. 9. Provide them with a solid foundation for higher education, ie for doctoral dissertations in this scientific area. B. Skills, Abilities 1. To be able to develop views, which will be based on arguments. 2. To be able to describe and analyze the different models of education administration, especially school leadership. 3. To be able and able to link the issues of education administration with social justice. 4. Be able to critically relate the way leadership theories relate to educational practice. 5. Be able to challenge dominant, well-established perceptions and practices. To think outside the "framework" and develop views & approaches, which they will (support) using the appropriate theories. 6. To acquire the ability of effective oral & written formulation of the appropriate arguments for the occasion. 7. To acquire the ability to critically reflect new knowledge, so as to contribute to policies and practices for improving education. 8. To combine theoretical & empirical data, so as to play a leading role in education for the promotion of social justice. 9. To be able to put their knowledge into practice by combining theory and practice. a. 10. Conduct an individual or group critical research on the important issue of education administration.
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Retrieve, analyse and synthesise data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Adapt to new situations
  • Make decisions
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Work in an international context
  • Work in an interdisciplinary team
  • Generate new research ideas
  • Appreciate diversity and multiculturality
  • Demonstrate social, professional and ethical commitment and sensitivity to gender issues
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
The general aim of the course is to provide supplies to current or future professionals interested in working to improve education. This goal is served when students understand and become able and able to make a critical analysis of the relevant theoretical production and their application in practice. That is why the connection with the wider economic, political and social developments is a basic precondition for the understanding of the modern theoretical production in matters of education administration. The section focuses on the ways in which social justice and equality issues affect the way education is administered. In this context, issues such as the administrative structure and operation of the educational institution, the management of resources, the way and the decision-making bodies are examined. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of school management (democratic / collective operation, planning, crisis management, cooperation with parents & local community). Topics The Structure and Operation of the educational institution in Greece The Administrative Institutions School counselors and their role The Administration of the school unit Democratic schools School Management and Leadership School Leadership and Social Justice Collaboration of the school unit with parents and guardians Collaboration of the school unit with the local community & local organization Education funding
Keywords
school leadership, social justice, democracy in schools
Educational Material Types
  • Notes
  • Slide presentations
  • Video lectures
  • Multimedia
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Communication with Students
  • Use of ICT in Student Assessment
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures12
Seminars12
Fieldwork36
Reading Assigment90
Project60
Written assigments90
Total300
Student Assessment
Description
The evaluation of students / three is done with: 1. Critical commentary on concepts, theories, approaches & given texts (20% of the final score). Students are expected to participate in the discussions, to study the material assigned to them by completing the respective assignments. 2. Preparation and presentation of bibliographic work (20% of the final grade). Students will present a small, bibliographic work related to one of the topics of the course. 3. Written research project report of 5,000 - 6,000 (60% of the final score). As for the evaluation of the assignments, it is done based on the following criteria ([will be displayed on the teacher's personal website, as well as on the Blackboard): • Scientific adequacy (use of sources, citation of different approaches, documentation, validity of bibliography, scientific writing). • Development & structure of the text (adequate coverage of the object, correct structure, syntax, format & correct writing of the text). • Critical ability (ability to compose & analyze, utilize research data & sources, persuasiveness of argumentation, creation of new questions).
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Assignment (Formative, Summative)
  • Oral Exams (Formative, Summative)
  • Performance / Staging (Formative, Summative)
  • Report (Formative, Summative)
Bibliography
Additional bibliography for study
Anderson, G. (1990). Toward a Critical Constructivist Approach to School Administration: Invisibility, Legitimation and the Study of Non-Events,” Educational Administration Quarterly 26(1), 38-59. Apple, M. W. (1998). How the conservative restoration is justified: Leadership and subordination in educational policy. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 1(1), 3-17. Apple, M. & Beane, J. (Eds.). Democratic Schools: Lessons from the Chalk Face. Buckingham: Open University Press. Blackmore, J. (2002). Leadership for socially just schooling: More substance and less style in high risk, low-trust times? Journal of School Leadership, 12, 198-222. Blumer, I., & Tatum, B. D. (1999). Creating a community of allies: How one school system attempted to create an anti-racist environment. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 2(3), 255-267. Corson, D. (1996). Critical policy making: Emancipatory school-site leadership in multiethnic schools. Forum of Education, 52(2). Corson, D. (2000). Emancipatory leadership. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 3(2), 93-120. Foster, M. (1994). The role of community and culture in school reform efforts: Examining the views of African-American teachers. Educational Foundations, 8(2), 5-26. Foster, W. (1989). Toward a critical practice of leadership. In J. Smyth (Ed.), Critical perspectives on educational leadership (pp. 39-62). London: Falmer Press. Furman, G. & Gruenwald, D. (2004). Expanding the landscape of social justice: A critical ecological analysis. Educational Administration Quarterly40 (1), 47-76. Gemmill, G., & Oakley, J. (1997). Leadership: An alienating social myth? In K. Grint (Ed.), Leadership: Classical, contemporary and critical approaches(pp. 272-288). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Glickman, C. (1998). Educational leadership for democratic purpose: what do we mean? International Journal of Leadership in Education, 1(1), 47-53. Goeppinger, A. (2002). The fallacies of our reality: A deconstructive look at community and leadership. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 5(1), 77-83. Grogan, M. (2002). Influences of the discourse of globalisation on mentoring for gender equity and social justice in educational leadership. Leading & Managing, 8(2), 123-134. Henze, R., Katz, A. & Norte, E. (2000). Rethinking the Concept of Racial or Ethnic Conflict in Schools: A Leadership Perspective. Race, Ethnicity and Education3 (2) 195 – 206. Laible, J., & Harrington, S. (1998). The power and the possibility of leading with alternative values. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 1(2), 111-135. Lopez, G. (2003). The (Racially Neutral) Politics of Education: A Critical Race Theory Perspective. Educational Administration Quarterly39 (1), 68-94. Lugg, C. A. (2003). Our straitlaced administrators: The law, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered educational administrators, and the assimilationist imperative. Journal of School Leadership, 13, 51-85. Marshall, C. (2004). Social justice challenges to educational administration: Introduction to a special issue. Educational Administration Quarterly40 (1), 3-13. May, S. (1994). School organization: Achieving structural change. In S. May (Ed.), Making multicultural education work(pp. 64-97). Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters. McGee Banks, C. A. (1995). Gender and race as factors in educational leadership and administration. In J. A. Banks & C. A. McGee Banks (Eds.), Handbook of research on multicultural education. New York: Simon & Schuster Macmillan. McKenzie, K. & Scheurich, J. (2004). Equity Traps: A useful construct for preparing principals to lead schools that are successful with racially diverse students. Educational Administration Quarterly 40 (5), 601-632. McLaren, P. (1999). Revolutionary leadership and pedagogical praxis: Revisitingthe legacy of Che Guevara. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 2(3), 269-292. Riehl, C. (2000). The principal's role in creating inclusive schools for diverse students: A review of normative, empirical, and critical literature on the practice of educational administration. Review of Educational Research, 70(1), 55-82. Ryan, J. (1998). Critical leadership for education in a postmodern world: Emancipation, resistance and communal action. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 1(3), 257-278. Ryan, J. (2003). Leading diverse schools. Dordrecht: Kluwer. Shields, C. (2003). Good intentions are not enough: Transformative leadership for communities of difference.Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. Smyth, J. (1989). A "pedagogical" and "educative" view of leadership. In J. Smyth (Ed.), Critical perspectives on educational leadership(pp. 179-204). London: Falmer. Solomon, R. P. (2002). School leaders and anti-racism: Overcoming pedagogical and political obstacles. Journal of School Leadership, 12, 174-197. Tierney, W. (1989). Advancing Democracy: A Critical Interpretation of Leadership. Peabody Journal of Education 66(3), 157-175. Vaid, U. (1995). Leadership conundrums, Virtual equality: The mainstreaming of gay and lesbian liberation(pp. 346-372). New York: Doubleday. Walker, A. & Walker, J. (1998). Challenging the boundaries of sameness: Leadership through valuing difference, Journal of Educational Administration 36(1), 8-28. Woods, P. (2004). Democratic leadership: Drawing distinctions with distributed leadership. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 7(1), 3-26. Woolfolk, A. E., & Brooks, D. M. (1983). Nonverbal Communication in Teaching. In E. W. Gordon (Ed.), Review of Research in Education (Vol. 10). Washington: American Educational Research Association. York-Barr, J. & Duke, K. (2004). What Do We Know About Teacher Leadership? Findings From Two Decades of Scholarship. Review of Educational Research, 74(3), 255-316. Ζάχος, Θ. Δ. (2007). Οικονομία της Αγοράς, Σχολική Αποτυχία και Σχολική «Αποτελεσματικότητα», Σύγχρονα Θέματα, 97, 43-50. Ζάχος, Θ. Δ. (Ιούλιος, 2018). Η Εκπαίδευση για το Διάλογο και την Επικοινωνία στην τρέχουσα Διεθνή Συγκυρία. Ανακοίνωση στο «Διάλογο Πολιτών Καβάλας». Καβάλα. Zeki, C. P. (2009). The importance of non-verbal communication in classroom management. Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1, 1443-1449.
Last Update
02-12-2020