Course Information
TitlePSYCHOLOGY IN EDUCATION: THEORY, RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS / PSYCHOLOGY IN EDUCATION: THEORY, RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS
CodeERA-101
FacultyPhilosophy
SchoolPsychology
Cycle / Level1st / Undergraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID600000005

Programme of Study: PPS Tmīmatos PSychologías (2017-sīmera)

Registered students: 5
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
KORMOSElective Courses7410

Class Information
Academic Year2019 – 2020
Class PeriodWinter
Faculty Instructors
Weekly Hours3
Class ID
600144576
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Erasmus
The course is also offered to exchange programme students.
Language of Instruction
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Prerequisites
General Prerequisites
None
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course students are expected to (a) achieve an in-depth understanding of how contemporary psychological theories on cognition and motivation are associated with educational practice, (b) get acquainted with current research findings on self-regulated learning and their implications for students, teachers and parents
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Retrieve, analyse and synthesise data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Adapt to new situations
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Generate new research ideas
  • Appreciate diversity and multiculturality
  • Respect natural environment
  • Demonstrate social, professional and ethical commitment and sensitivity to gender issues
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
The course is divided into two parts: A. Psychology in Education: Introductory issues about the psychology of learning and instruction. Motivation in Education: contemporary motivational theories and their applications in educational settings (expectancy - value theory, implicit theories of intelligence, achievement goal orientations, self-determination, interest). Avoidance behaviors: avoidance of help-seeking and self-handicapping strategies. Parents’ involvement in children's school life. Β. Self-regulated learning: Theoretical models, research findings, and intervention programs in educational settings; Development of critical thinking skills in education: Argumentation skills, recognition of fallacies, scientific thinking skills, and critical reading skills.
Keywords
Self-regulated learning, Critical thinking skills, Motivation in Education, Avoidance behaviors in school settings, Parental involvement
Educational Material Types
  • Slide presentations
  • Multimedia
  • Interactive excersises
  • Recommended Books and Research Articles
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Communication with Students
Description
Moodle platform via elearning (https://elearning.auth.gr/course/view.php?id=7782&lang=en) Use of audio-visual material via internet PowerPoint presentations Communicion with the students (email)
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures391.5
Reading Assigment391.5
Project
Written assigments1044
Exams783
Total26010
Student Assessment
Description
Students will be asked: --to read relevant literature, which they will discuss with the instructor in class -to present articles (in groups) in class. -to participate in class activities, -to write essays for each part of the course - to participate in oral exams
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Assignment (Summative)
  • Oral Exams (Summative)
  • Performance / Staging (Formative, Summative)
  • Labortatory Assignment (Summative)
  • Participation in class activities (Summative)
Bibliography
Course Bibliography (Eudoxus)
Δεν διανέμεται σύγγραμμα μέσω του Εύδοξου
Additional bibliography for study
Recommended readings Books Elliot, A. J., & Dweck, C. S. (2005) (Eds). Handbook of competence and motivation. New York: The Guilford Press. Harpern, D. F. (2014). Thought and knowledge: An Introduction to Critical Thinking (5th ed.). New York: Psychology Press, Taylor and Francis Group. Lipman, M. (2003). Thinking in education (2nded.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pintrich, P. R., & Schunk, D. H. (1996). Motivation in education. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Articles Bannert, M., & Reimann, P. (2012). Supporting self-regulated hypermedia learning through prompts. Instructional Science, 40, 193–211. DOI 10.1007/s11251-011-9167-4 Boekaerts, M., &Corno, L. (2005). Self-regulation in the classroom: A perspective on assessment and intervention. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 54, 199-231. Cleary, T. J.& Zimmerman, B. J. (2004). Self-regulation Empowerment program: A school-based program to enhance self-regulated and self-motivated cycles of student learning. Psychology in the Schools, 41(5), 537-550. DOI: 10.1002/pits.10177 Dignath, C., &Buttner, G. (2008). Components of fostering self-regulated learning among students. A meta-analysis on intervention studies at primary and secondary school level. Metacognition and Learning, 3, 231-264. Eccles, J. S. (2007). Families, schools, and developing of achievement-related motivations and engagement. In J. E. Grusec& P. D. Hastings (Eds.), Handbook of socialization: Theory and research (pp. 665–691). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Efklides, A. (2011). Interactions of metacognition with motivation and affect in self-regulated learning: The MASRL model. EducationalPsychologist, 46, 6-25. Efklides, A. (2013). Cognition, motivation, and affect in the school context: Metacognitive experiences in the regulation of learning. In S. Kreitler (Ed.), Cognition and motivation: Forging an interdisciplinary perspective (pp.383-406). New York: Cambridge University Press. Gonida, E. N., & Cortina, K. (2014). Parent involvement in homework: Relations with parent and student achievement-related motivational beliefs and achievement. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 84, 376-396. Gonida, E. N., &Metallidou,P. (2015). Beliefs about school learning during adolescence: Their contribution to motivational beliefs and school achievement. Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology, 5, 63-76. Gonida, Ε., Kiosseoglou, G, &Leondari, A. (2006). Implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence and school achievement: Developmental differences and educational implications. The American Journal of Psychology, 119, 223-238. Gonida, E. N., Voulala, K., &Kiosseoglou, G. (2009). Students' achievement goal orientations and their behavioral and emotional engagement: Co-examining the role of perceived school goal structures and parent goals during adolescence. Learning and Individual Differences,19, 53–60. Gonida, E. N., Karabenick, S. A., Makara, K. A., &Hatzikyriakou, G. (2014). Perceived parent goals and student goal orientations as predictors of seeking or not seeking help: Does age matter? Learning and Instruction, 33, 120-130. Gonzalez-DeHass, A. R., Willems, P. P., & Doan Holbein, M. F. (2005). Examining the relationship between parental involvement and student motivation. Educational Psychology Review, 17, 99–123. doi:10.1007/s10648-005-3949-7 Hulleman, C. S., Barron, K. E., Kosovich, J. J., &Lazowski, R. A. (2015). Student motivation: current theories, constructs, and interventions within an expectancy-value framework. In A. Lipnevich, F., Preckel, & R. Roberts (Eds.), Psychosocial skills and school systems in the Twenty-first century: Theory, research, and applications.Springer. Karabenick, S. A., & Berger, J.-L. (2013). Help seeking as self-regulated learning strategy. In H. Bembenutty, T. Cleary, & A. Kitsantas (Eds.), Applications of self-regulated learning across diverse disciplines: A tribute to Barry J. Zimmerman (pp. 237-261). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. Lazowski, R. A., &Hulleman, C. S. (2015). Motivation Interventions in Education: A Meta-Analytic Review. Review of Educational Research, XX, 1 –39. Martin, L., & Halpern, D. (2011). Pedagogy for developing critical thinking in adolescents: Explicit instruction produces greater gains. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 6, 1-13. Metallidou, P., &Vlachou, A. (2010). Children’s self-regulated learning profile in language and mathematics: The role of task value beliefs. Psychology in the Schools, 47, 776-788. Metallidou, P. (2012). Epistemological beliefs as predictors of self-regulated learning strategies in middle school students. School Psychology International, 34(3), 283-298. Pino-Pasternak, D., Basilio, M., & Whitebread, D. (2014). Interventions and Classroom Contexts That Promote Self-Regulated Learning: Two Intervention Studies in United Kingdom Primary Classrooms. PSYKHE, 23(2), 1-13. doi:10.7764/psykhe.23.2.739 Ryan, A. M., Pintrich, P.R., &Midgley, C. (2001). Avoiding seeking help in the classroom: Who and why? Educational Psychology Review, 13, 93–114. Schwinger, M., &Stiensmeier-Pelster, J. (2011). Prevention of self-handicapping – The protective function of mastery goals. Learning and Individual Differences, 21, 699-709. Senko, C., Hulleman, C. S., &Harackiewicz, J. M. (2011). Achievement goal theory at the crossroads: Old controversies, current challenges, and new directions. Educational Psychologist. DOI: 10.1080/00461520.2011.538646 Tzohar-Rosen, M., & Kramarski, B. (2014). Metacognition, motivation and emotions: Contribution of self-regulated learning to solving mathematical problems. Global Education Review, 1 (4), 76-95. Urdan, T., &Midgley, C. (2003). Changes in the perceived classroom goal structure and pattern of adaptive learning during early adolescence. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 28, 524–551. doi:10.1016/S0361-476X(02)00060-7 Vauras, M., Salonen, P., Lehtinen, E., &Lepola, J. (2001). Long-term development of motivation and cognition in family and school contexts. In S. Volet& S. Jarvela (Eds.), Motivation in learning contexts: Theoretical advances and methodological implications (pp. 295–315). Oxford, UK: Pergamon. Wigfield, A., & Eccles, J. S. (2000).Expectancy–value theory of achievement motivation.Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 68–81 Wigfield, A., & Cambria, J. (2010). Students’ achievement values, goal orientations and interest: Definitions, development and relations to achievement outcomes. Developmental Review, 30, 1-35.
Last Update
13-12-2019