MORPHOLOGY

Course Information
TitleΜΟΡΦΟΛΟΓΙΑ / MORPHOLOGY
CodeΓλ2-321
FacultyPhilosophy
SchoolEnglish Language and Literature
Cycle / Level1st / Undergraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID600007498

Programme of Study: 2018-2019

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
KORMOSElective CoursesWinter/Spring-6

Class Information
Academic Year2016 – 2017
Class PeriodSpring
Faculty Instructors
Weekly Hours3
Total Hours39
Class ID
600067830
Type of the Course
  • Background
  • Scientific Area
Course Category
Specific Foundation / Core
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Digital Course Content
Erasmus
The course is also offered to exchange programme students.
Language of Instruction
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Prerequisites
Required Courses
  • Γλ2-120 INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL AND ENGLISH LINGUISTICS
Learning Outcomes
In this course I present Morphology from the standpoint of current, mainstream linguistic theory. My main concern is to provide students with the appropriate comprehensive introduction to the nature of word structure, the basic concepts of word-formation processes and the ways in which word-formation interacts with phonology, syntax and the lexicon. Initially, basic concepts, such as morpheme, morph formative, allomorph, are thoroughly analyzed. More¬over, at this stage the categorical, semantic and distnbutional force of the affix are exposed to¬gether with the major morphological processes, such as compounding and denvation. Further, the issues of productivity and lexicalization are pedantically discussed. Finally, word-formation rules and their order as well as the notion of Argument Structure in Morphology are exten¬sively presented and commented. Examples and data are drawn from English, Greek and a variety of Non-IE languages. The outcome of the course is very positive, especially with those students involved with fieldwork research and presentation. The knowledge and the skills acquired from the course will be invaluable for further research in Morphology at a post graduate level. Moreover, the knowledge acquired from this course is absolutely necessary in teaching English as a foreign language at the primary and secondary educatiuon.
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Retrieve, analyse and synthesise data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Adapt to new situations
  • Make decisions
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Work in an international context
  • Generate new research ideas
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
A comprehensive introduction to the nature of word structure, the basic concepts of word-formation processes and the ways in which word-formation interacts with phonology, syntax and the lexicon are taught. Initially, basic concepts, such as morpheme, morph formative, allomorph, are thoroughly analyzed. Moreover, at this stage the categorical, semantic and distributional force of the affix are exposed together with the major morphological processes, such as compounding and derivation. Further, the issues of productivity and lexicalization are pedantically discussed. Finally, word-formation rules and their order as well as the notion of Argument Structure in Morphology are extensively presented and commented. Examples and data are drawn from English, Greek and a variety of Non-IE languages.
Keywords
word structure, derivation, compounding, word formation rules
Educational Material Types
  • Notes
  • Slide presentations
  • Video lectures
  • Audio
  • Book
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures
Seminars
Fieldwork
Project
Written assigments
Total
Student Assessment
Description
I. Final Exam, or 2. Original research presentation paper, presented and discussed in the classroom., or 3. Continuous Assessment Exams in the classroom
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Exam with Extended Answer Questions (Formative)
  • Performance / Staging (Formative)
  • Written Exam with Problem Solving (Formative)
Bibliography
Course Bibliography (Eudoxus)
Course textbook, "Linguistic Morphology" Elizabeth Mela-Athanasopoulou, University Studio Press, Thessaloniki 2007
Additional bibliography for study
Aikhenvald, S. (2007). Typological distinctions in word formation. In T. Shopen (Ed.), Language Typology and Syntactic Description, volume III: Grammatical categories and the lexicon (2n ed) (pp. 1-65). Cambridge: CUP. Anastasiadi-Simeonidi, Anna, Angela Ralli &Despin Chila-Markopoulou. 2003. To genos. Patakis, Athina. Aronoff, Mark. 1998. Gender agreement as morphology. In: The Proceedings of the First Mediterranean Conference of Morphology, Eds. Booij, G., A. Ralli, S. Scalise, University of Patras. pp. 7-18 Bauer, L. (1998). Is there a class of neoclassical compounds, and if so is it productive? Linguistics, 36. 403-422. Bauer, L. (2001). Compounding. In M. Haspelmath, E. Konig, W. Oesterreicher, & W. Raible (Eds.) Language typology and language universals (pp. 695-707). Berlin, New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Bauer, L. (2002). What can we do with derivational morphology. Bendjaballah, W. U. Dressier, O.Pfeiffer, & M. D. Voeikova (Eds.), Morphology 2000. Selected papers from the 9th mor¬phology meeting (pp. 37-48). Amsterdam, Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Bauer, L. (2005). The borderline between derivation and compounding. In W. Dressier, D. Kastovsky, 0. E. Pfeiffer, & Rainer, F. (Eds.), Morphology and its demarcations (pp. 97-108). Amsterdam. Philadelphia: John Benjamins. – Bauer L. (2006). Compound. In K. Brown (Ed.), Encyclopedia of language and linguistics (II volume, pp. 719-726). Oxford: Elsevier. Booij, G. (2009). Compounding and construction morphology. In R. Lieber, & P. Stekauer (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of compounding (pp. 201—216). OUP McCarthy, A. (1992). Current morphology. London and New York: Routledge. Cleris, Christos & George Babiniotis. 1998. Grammatiki tis Neas Ellinikis. To onoma. Ellinika Grammata. Athina. Colaklides, Peter. 1964. The pattern of Gender in Modern Greek. Linguistics 5: 65-68. University of Athens. Corbett, G. 1991. Gender. CUP, Cambridge. Corbett, G. 1998. Morphology and Agreement, in The Handbook of Morphology, Andrew Spencer and Arnold M. Zwicky eds. Blackwell, Oxford Haspelmath, M. (2002). Understanding morphology. Oxford: OUPress. Himmelmann, N. P. (2004). Lexicalization and grammaticalization: Opposite or orthogonal? In W. Bisang, N. P. Himmelmann, & B. Wiemer (Eds.), What makes grammaticalization? A look from its fringes and its components (pp. 21-42). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Hockett, C.F. 1958. A Course in Modern Linguistics. Macmillan, New York. Jackendoff, R. S. (2002). Foundations of language. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Jurafsky, D. (1996). Universals tendencies in the semantics of the diminutive. Language. 72, 533-578 Mela-Athanasopoulou, Elizabeth. 2002. English loan words in Modern Greek. In Studies in Greek Linguistics 22, p 440-450, Vol 1. Aristotle University, Thessaloniki. Mela-Athanasopoulou, Elizabeth. 2009. The Gender of he English Derived Nominal and the Modern Greek Counterpart. A Morphological Approach. In Greek Research in Australia, Proceedings of the Biennial International Conference of Greek Studies, pp 223-234. Eds. Close Elizabeth el al., Flinders University, Adelaide 2009, Australia. Melissaropoulou Dimitra & Anglea Ralli. 2008. Headedness in diminutive formation: Evidence from Modern Greek and its dialectal variation. In: Academiai Kiado. Acta Linguistica Hungaria – Journal Article. Vol. 55, 183-204. Philippaki-Warburton, Irene, David Holton & Peter A. Mackridge. 2004. Greek: an essential grammar of the modern language. Routledge. Ralli, Angela. 1994. Feature representations and feature-passing operations in Greek nominal inflection. In Proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Theoretical and Applied Linguistics: p. 19-45. Thessaloniki, English Department, Aristotle University. Ralli, Angela. 2002. The role of morphology in gender determination: Evidence from Modern Greek. Linguistics 40: 519-551 Ralli, Angela. 2003. Morphology on Greek Linguistics: The State of Art, in Journal of Greek Linguistics 4, pp. 77-129. John Benjamins. Ritter, Nancy. 1993. Where’s Gender? In Linguistic inquiry, Vol. 24, 4, p. 795-803, Fall 1993. Roché, Michael. 2000. Gender inversion in Romance derivatives with –arius. In Morphology 2000. Eds. Benjaballah S, Dressler W.U. Pfeiffer O.E and M.D Voeikova. John Benjamins. Pp. 283-291 Sotiropoulos, Dimitri. 1972. Noun Morphology of Modern Demotic Greek. Mouton. Hungary. Triantafyllides, Manolis, 1991. Neoelliniki Grammatiki. Manolis Triantafyllides Institute, Thessaloniki.
Last Update
07-09-2013