PRAGMATICS

Course Information
TitleΠΡΑΓΜΑΤΟΛΟΓΙΑ / PRAGMATICS
CodeΓλ2-350
FacultyPhilosophy
SchoolEnglish Language and Literature
Cycle / Level1st / Undergraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID600007056

Programme of Study: 2018-2019

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
KORMOSElective CoursesWinter/Spring-6

Class Information
Academic Year2016 – 2017
Class PeriodWinter
Class ID
600068123
Type of the Course
  • Scientific Area
Course Category
Specific Foundation / Core
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Digital Course Content
Erasmus
The course is also offered to exchange programme students.
Language of Instruction
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Prerequisites
Required Courses
  • Γλ2-341 SEMANTICS
General Prerequisites
Background in general linguistics and semantics
Learning Outcomes
1. Understand basic concepts in pragmatics 2. Learn about different approaches and theories in pragmatics and become familiar with latest research in pragmatics 4. Be able to explain why and how meaning depends on the use of language 5. Learn analytical techniques for investigating language use in context 6. Acquire a good background for further studies at postgraduate level
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Appreciate diversity and multiculturality
  • Demonstrate social, professional and ethical commitment and sensitivity to gender issues
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
The course is an introduction to pragmatics -the systematic study of meaning dependent on the use of language. The main goal of the course is to familiarize undergraduate students with basic concepts and theories in pragmatics and help them develop fundamental skills in pragmatic analysis. Major topics covered by the course include: deixis, reference, presupposition, implicature, speech acts, politeness, conversation and preference structure, discourse markers, gender and language use, and cross-cultural pragmatics.
Keywords
inference, context, utterance meaning, speaker meaning, implicature, speech act
Educational Material Types
  • Notes
  • Slide presentations
  • Interactive excersises
  • Book
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Communication with Students
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures1004
Tutorial502
Total1506
Student Assessment
Description
Student assessment will be based on final written exam including short excersises and extended answer questions.
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Exam with Extended Answer Questions (Summative)
  • Written Exam with Problem Solving (Summative)
Bibliography
Course Bibliography (Eudoxus)
Required readings: Huang, Y. (2007). Pragmatics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Yule, G. (1996). Pragmatics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Additional bibliography for study
Week 1: What is pragmatics? Optional readings: Blakemore, D. (1992). Understanding Utterances: An Introduction to Pragmatics, pp. 3-23. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers. Mey, J. L. (2001). Pragmatics: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell. Chapters 1-2. Thomas, J. A. (1995). Meaning in Interaction: An Introduction to Pragmatics, pp. 1-23. Harlow: Longman. Week 2: Deixis and reference Optional readings: Hanks, W. (1992). The indexical ground of deictic reference. In A. Duranti and C. Goodwin (Εds.), Rethinking Context, pp. 43-76. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Fillmore, C. J. 1997. Lectures on deixis. Stanford: CSLI. Levinson, S. C. (2004). Deixis. In L. Horn and G. Ward (Eds.), The Handbook of Pragmatics, pp. 97-121. Oxford: Blackwell. Week 3: Presupposition Optional readings: Atlas J. D. (2004). Presupposition. In L. Horn and G. Ward (Eds.), The Handbook of Pragmatics, pp. 29-52. Oxford: Blackwell. Green, G. M. (1996). Pragmatics and Natural Language Understanding, pp. 72-86. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Levinson, S. C. (1983). Pragmatics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapter 4. Week 4: Implicature I Optional readings: Grice, H. P. (1989). Studies in the Ways of Words. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press. Part I and Retrospective Epilogue. Horn, L. C. (2004). Implicature. In L. Horn and G. Ward (Eds.), The Handbook of Pragmatics, pp. 3-28. Oxford: Blackwell. Levinson, S. C. (1983). Pragmatics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapter 3. Week 5: Implicature II Optional readings: Horn, L. C. (1984). Toward a new taxonomy for pragmatic inference: Q-based and R-based implicature. In D. Schiffrin (Ed.), Meaning, Form, and Use in Context: Linguistic Applications, pp. 11-42. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press. Levinson, S. C. (1995). Three levels of meaning. In F. R. Palmer (Ed.), Grammar and Meaning: Essays in Honour of SIR JOHN LYONS, pp. 90-115. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Levinson, S. C. (2000). Presumptive Meanings: The Theory of Generalized Conversational Implicature. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Chapters 1, 2. Week 6: Pragmatics and cognition: Relevance Theory Optional readings: Wilson, D. and Sperber, D. (2004). Relevance theory. In L. Horn and G. Ward (Eds.), The Handbook of Pragmatics, pp. 607-632. Oxford: Blackwell. Week 7: Speech acts I Optional readings: Austin, J. L. (1962). How to Do Things with Words. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Sadock, J. (2004). Speech acts. In L. Horn and G. Ward (Eds.), The Handbook of Pragmatics, pp. 53-73. Oxford: Blackwell. Sbisà, M. (1995). Speech act theory. In J. Verschueren, J.-A. Oestman, and J. Blommaert (Eds.), Handbook of Pragmatics, pp. 495-505. Amsterdam: Benjamins. Searle, J. R. (1979). A taxonomy of illocutionary acts. In J. Searle, Expression and Meaning: Studies in the Theory of Speech Acts, pp. 1-29. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Week 8: Speech acts II: Politeness Optional readings: Brown, P. and Levinson, S. C. (1987). Politeness: Some Universals in Language Usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapters 1, 2. Searle, J. (1979). Indirect speech acts. In J. Searle, Expression and Meaning: Studies in the Theory of Speech Acts, pp. 30-57. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Week 9: Conversation analysis I Optional readings Hutchby, I. and R. Wooffitt. (1997). Conversation Analysis. Cambridge: Polity Press. Chapter 1. Nofsinger, E. (1990). Everyday Conversation. Sage. Chapters 1, 2. Week 10: Conversation analysis II Optional readings: Hutchby, I. and R. Wooffitt. (1997). Conversation Analysis. Cambridge: Polity Press. Chapters 2, 3. Nofsinger, E. (1990). Everyday Conversation. Sage. Chapters 3, 4. Week 11: Discourse markers Optional readings: Heritage, J. (1984). A change-of-state token and aspects of its sequential placement. In J. Atkinson and J. Heritage (Eds.), Structures of Social Action, pp. 299-335. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Schiffrin, D. (1985). Conversational coherence: The role of well. Language 61(3): 640-667. Schiffrin, D. (2003). Discourse markers: Language, Meaning and Context. In D. Schiffrin, D. Tannen and H. Hamilton (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis, pp. 54-75. Wiley-Blackwell. Week 12 Gender and pragmatics Optional readings: Eckert, P. and S. McConnell-Ginet. (2003). Language and Gender. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapters 4, 6, 7. Week 13: Intercultural pragmatics Optional readings: Wierzbicka, A. (1985). Different cultures, different languages, different speech acts. Journal of Pragmatics 9: 145-78.
Last Update
23-02-2016