Psycholinguistics

Course Information
TitleΨυχογλωσσολογία / Psycholinguistics
CodeΓλ 555
FacultyPhilosophy
SchoolEnglish Language and Literature
Cycle / Level2nd / Postgraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID600004024

Programme of Study: PROGRAMMA METAPTYCΗIAKŌN SPOUDŌN 2016-2017

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
GlōssologíaElective CoursesWinter/Spring-7.5

Class Information
Academic Year2016 – 2017
Class PeriodSpring
Class ID
600072464
Course Type 2016-2020
  • Scientific Area
  • Skills Development
Course Type 2011-2015
Specific Foundation / Core
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Digital Course Content
Language of Instruction
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course students: 1. should have an advanced understanding of current research in psycholinguistics 2. should have developed an up-to-date knowledge of a broad range of areas of the psychology of language, including developmental and acquired language disorders 3. should have acquired the methodological and statistical skills that will allow them to conduct novel research in the psycholinguistics field and write a research paper
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Retrieve, analyse and synthesise data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Adapt to new situations
  • Make decisions
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Work in an interdisciplinary team
  • Generate new research ideas
  • Design and manage projects
  • Appreciate diversity and multiculturality
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
This course covers central topics in psycholinguistics, including: interfaces in language processing; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; cognitive control mechanism; ambiguity resolution in children and adults; and bilingualism effects on language processing. The course also considers developmental language disorders (Specific Language Impairment, High Functioning Autism) and acquired language disorders (Broca's aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia, Primary Progressive Aphasia) in monolingual and bilingual children and adults, respectively. Experimental techniques (eye-tracking, self-paced reading/listening, cross-modal priming) and methods of statistical analysis and data interpretion are also examined.
Keywords
interfaces in language processing, language disorders, novel research design, data analysis & interpretation
Educational Material Types
  • Notes
  • Slide presentations
  • Multimedia
  • Interactive excersises
  • Book
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Communication with Students
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures782.8
Reading Assigment
Project
Written assigments
Total782.8
Student Assessment
Description
There will be an oral presentation of a research article as well as a written essay at the end of the course.
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Assignment (Summative)
  • Performance / Staging (Formative)
Bibliography
Course Bibliography (Eudoxus)
Harley, T. (2001). The Psychology of Language: From Data to Theory. New York, NY: Psychology Press.
Additional bibliography for study
Chen, E., E. Gibson, & F. Wolf (2005). Online syntactic storage costs in sentence comprehension. Journal of Memory and Language, 52, 144-169. Gibson, E., T. Desmet, D. Grodner, D. Watson, & K. Ko (2005). Reading relative clauses in English. Cognitive Linguistics, 16, 313-353. Gibson, E., & N. Pearlmutter (1998). Constraints on sentence comprehension.Trends in Cognitive Science, 2, 262-268. Peristeri, E., & I. M. Tsimpli (2013). Pronoun processing in Broca’s aphasia: Discourse–syntax effects in ambiguous anaphora resolution. Aphasiology, 27 (11), 1381-1407. Sedivy, J. C., M. K. Tanenhaus, G. C. Chambers, & G. N. Carlson (1999). Achieving incremental semantic interpretation through contextual representation. Cognition, 71, 109-147. Tanenhaus, M., M. Spivey-Knowlton, K. Eberhard, & J. Sedivy (1995). Integration of visual and linguistic information in spoken language comprehension. Science, 268, 1632-1634. Tsimpli, I. M., E. Peristeri, & M. Andreou (2016). Narrative production in monolingual and bilingual children with specific language impairment. Applied Psycholinguistics, 37, 195-216.
Last Update
03-04-2016