Morphology

Course Information
TitleΜορφολογία / Morphology
CodeΓλ 590
FacultyPhilosophy
SchoolEnglish Language and Literature
Cycle / Level2nd / Postgraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID600004020

Programme of Study: PROGRAMMA METAPTYCΗIAKŌN SPOUDŌN 2016-2017

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
GlōssologíaElective CoursesWinter/Spring-7.5

Class Information
Academic Year2016 – 2017
Class PeriodSpring
Class ID
600072468
Course Type 2016-2020
  • General Knowledge
  • Scientific Area
Course Type 2011-2015
Specific Foundation / Core
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Digital Course Content
Erasmus
The course is also offered to exchange programme students.
Language of Instruction
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Learning Outcomes
Students will have learnt the basic principles of Morphology with regard to word structure, both in inflectional and derivational morphology as well as compounding. In this way they will acquire the skills appropriate for the recording, the morphological analysis and description of languages, aiming at the writing of a Grammar, Dictionary and language textbooks.
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Retrieve, analyse and synthesise data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Make decisions
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Work in an international context
  • Work in an interdisciplinary team
  • Generate new research ideas
  • Design and manage projects
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
Ling2-590: Morphology Elizabeth Mela-Athanasopoulou The course will deal with the most recent theoretical developments in Morphology within the Generative Grammar framework. It will start with a survey of models of morphology and competing views with regard to the place of morphology in linguistic theory. In particular, it will give an overview of the current morphological issues and debates, such as interfaces between morphology and phonology or morphology and syntax, semantics, etc. The issue of morphology and psycholinguistics, e.g. to what extent the morphological structure of a word plays a role in its perception and production will also be included in the course. Moreover, the relation between inflection and word formation as well as compounding, cliticization and bracketing paradoxes will thoroughly be investigated. The course does not necessarily presuppose prior knowledge of Morphology. However, it is advisable that students attend the undergraduate courses on Morphology (e.g. Ling2-388 Inflectional Morphology). Finally, morphophonological analyses based on fieldwork research on dialect/language documentation, within the framework of documentary linguistics, will also be shown. Assessment: Research paper and/or in-class presentation Students will have learnt the basic principles of Morphology with regard to word structure, both in inflectional and derivational morphology as well as compounding. In this way they will acquire the skills appropriate for the recording, the morphological analysis and description of languages, aiming at the writing of a Grammar, Dictionary and language textbooks.
Keywords
Derivational and Inflectional Morphology, morphological interfaces, Compounding, fieldwork on language documentation.
Educational Material Types
  • Notes
  • Slide presentations
  • Audio
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Laboratory Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Communication with Students
Description
Use of technological equipment within the framework of the morphophonological analysis of languages, aiming at their documentation and description.
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures
Seminars
Laboratory Work
Fieldwork
Written assigments
Exams
Total
Student Assessment
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Exam with Extended Answer Questions (Formative, Summative)
  • Written Assignment (Formative, Summative)
  • Performance / Staging (Formative, Summative)
Bibliography
Additional bibliography for study
Books 1. Kalasha Grammar. 2014. Elizabeth Mela-Athanasopoulou. University Studio Press, Thessaloniki 2, Linguistic Morphology. 2009. Elizabeth Mela-Athanasopoulou. University Studio Press, Thessaloniki Articles 1. Conversion: A typological and functional analysis of the morphophonological structure of zero-derivation in English word formation. Selected papers of the 18th International Symposium on Theoretical & Applied Linguistics. Ed. A.Tsangalidis. Thessaloniki, 2009. Pp. 273-280. 2. A Morphophonological description of Kalasha as an Indo-Aryan Language with Ancient Greek Roots. In the Selected Papers of the International Conference on Language Documentation and Tradition (ICLDT-Ka) 7-9 Nov. 2008. Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Edited by Everhard Carol, Elizabeth Mela-Athanasopoulou. Thessaloniki 2011 University Studio Press. Pp 179-199 3. How many are we? A Demographic Research of the Kalash. In cooperation with Taleem Khan, the Selected Papers of the International Conference on Language Documentation and Tradition (ICLDT-Ka) 7-9 Nov. 2008. Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Edited by Everhard Carol, E. Mela-Athanasopoulou. Thessaloniki 2011 University Studio Press. Pp 247-256 4. The Kalasha woman today. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, Vol. 2, No. 7, September 2012. Pp 88-94 5. Documenting the Kalasha language: Some Challenges and Solutions. In the 1st International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation (ICLDC) University of Hawaii, Honolulu. March 2009 http://hdl.handle.net/10125/5005 Hawaii, USA 6. Semantically Motivated Suffixes in Gender Inversion. Evidence from ModGreek. In the Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. University of Chicago, USA. Ed Brian Joseph at al. University of Chicago 2011 http://www.ling.ohio-state.edu/ICGL/proceedings/6_Mela-athanasopoulou_A%20I_55.pdf 7. The Function of Semantically Motivated Suffixes in Gender Inversion of Modern Greek Derivatives. In the Selected papers of the 19th International Symposium on Theoretical & Applied Linguistics. Edited by Anastasios Tsangalidis. Thessaloniki, 2011, pp 337-343. http://www.enl.auth.gr/symposium19/19thpapers/033_Mela-Athanasopoulou.pdf 8. Adjectival Participles bearing on Unaccusativity Identification. Evidence from Modern Greek. In Major Trends in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics: Selected Papers from the 20thISTAL. London: Versita de Gruyter. 2013. Edited by N. Lavidas. (in press). 9. First steps to endangered language documentation: the Kalasha language, a case study. IJOAL Vol. 37, No 2, Jul-Dec 2011. Eds. Alok Kumar Das, Harpreet Kaur Bahri and Deepinder Singh, Bahri Publications, New Delhi. Pp 83-100 10. A morphophonological description of Kalasha as an Indo-Aryan language with Greek roots. US-China Foreign Language Journal, Vol. 9, No. 7 July 2011. David Publishing Co, Chicago, Ill., USA. Pp 405-420 11. The problem of word identification in Modern Greek dialects: evidence from Lefkada documented data. In the 21st ISTAL, 5-7 April 20132. Mattheoudaki M. et al, eds. (at the publishers) 12. Dialect fieldwork evidence of the Ionian islands and the notion of word identification in Modern Greek. In the 11th International Conference on Greek Linguistics, 26-29 Sept 2013, Rhodes. (at the publishers)
Last Update
13-04-2016