PSYCHOLOGY IN EDUCATION: THEORY, RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS

Course Information
TitlePSYCHOLOGY IN EDUCATION: THEORY, RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS / PSYCHOLOGY IN EDUCATION: THEORY, RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS
CodeERA-101
FacultyPhilosophy
SchoolPsychology
Cycle / Level1st / Undergraduate
Teaching PeriodWinter/Spring
CommonNo
StatusActive
Course ID600000005

Programme of Study: PPS Tmīmatos PSychologías (2017-sīmera)

Registered students: 0
OrientationAttendance TypeSemesterYearECTS
KORMOSElective Courses7410

Class Information
Academic Year2016 – 2017
Class PeriodSpring
Faculty Instructors
Weekly Hours3
Total Hours39
Class ID
600071452
Mode of Delivery
  • Face to face
Erasmus
The course is also offered to exchange programme students.
Language of Instruction
  • English (Instruction, Examination)
Learning Outcomes
by the end of the course students are expected to (a) achieve an in-depth understanding of how contemporary psychological theories on cognition, motivation, and counseling are associated with educational practice, (b) get acquainted with current research findings on self-regulated learning and their implications for students, teachers and parents.
General Competences
  • Apply knowledge in practice
  • Retrieve, analyse and synthesise data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Work autonomously
  • Work in teams
  • Generate new research ideas
  • Demonstrate social, professional and ethical commitment and sensitivity to gender issues
  • Be critical and self-critical
  • Advance free, creative and causative thinking
Course Content (Syllabus)
A. Psychology in Education: Introductory issues about learning and instruction; Self-regulated learning: Theoretical models, research findings, and intervention programs in educational settings; Development of critical thinking skills in education: Argumentation skills, recognition of fallacies, scientific thinking skills, and critical reading skills. B. Motivation in Education: Contemporary motivational theories and their applications in educational settings (expectancy - value theory, implicit theories of intelligence, achievement goal orientations, self-determination, interest). Avoidance behaviors: Avoidance of help-seeking and self-handicapping strategies. Parents’ involvement with student homework.
Keywords
Self-regulated learning, Critical thinking skills, Motivation in Education, Parental involvement, School counseling, Bullying
Educational Material Types
  • Slide presentations
  • Recommended Books and Research Articles
Use of Information and Communication Technologies
Use of ICT
  • Use of ICT in Course Teaching
  • Use of ICT in Communication with Students
Course Organization
ActivitiesWorkloadECTSIndividualTeamworkErasmus
Lectures391.5
Reading Assigment1305
Written assigments813.1
Total2509.6
Student Assessment
Description
Students will be asked to read relevant literature, which they will discuss with the instructor in class and/or present an article. Participation in class activities, written essays prepared by students, Participation in class activities.
Student Assessment methods
  • Written Assignment (Summative)
  • Performance / Staging (Summative)
  • Participation in class activities
Bibliography
Additional bibliography for study
Recommended readings Books Elliot, A. J., &Dweck, C. S. (2005) (Eds). Handbook of competence and motivation. New York: The Guilford Press. Harpern, D. F. (2014). Thought and knowledge: An Introduction to Critical Thinking (5th ed.). New York: Psychology Press, Taylor and Francis Group. Lipman, M. (2003). Thinking in education (2nded.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pintrich, P. R., & Schunk, D. H. (1996). Motivation in education. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Articles Boekaerts, M., &Corno, L. (2005). Self-regulation in the classroom: A perspective on assessment and intervention. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 54, 199-231. Dignath, C., &Buttner, G. (2008). Components of fostering self-regulated learning among students. A meta-analysis on intervention studies at primary and secondary school level. Metacognition and Learning, 3, 231-264. Eccles, J. S. (2007). Families, schools, and developing of achievement-related motivations and engagement. In J. E. Grusec& P. D. Hastings (Eds.), Handbook of socialization: Theory and research (pp. 665–691). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Efklides, A. (2011). Interactions of metacognition with motivation and affect in self-regulated learning: The MASRL model. EducationalPsychologist, 46, 6-25. Efklides, A. (2013). Cognition, motivation, and affect in the school context: Metacognitive experiences in the regulation of learning. In S. Kreitler (Ed.), Cognition and motivation: Forging an interdisciplinary perspective (pp.383-406). New York: Cambridge University Press. Gonida, E. N., & Cortina, K. (2014). Parent involvement in homework: Relations with parent and student achievement-related motivational beliefs and achievement. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 84, 376-396. Gonida, E. N., &Metallidou,P. (2015). Beliefs about school learning during adolescence: Their contribution to motivational beliefs and school achievement. Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology, 5, 63-76. Gonida, Ε., Kiosseoglou, G, &Leondari, A. (2006). Implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence and school achievement: Developmental differences and educational implications. The American Journal of Psychology, 119, 223-238. Gonida, E. N., Voulala, K., &Kiosseoglou, G. (2009). Students' achievement goal orientations and their behavioral and emotional engagement: Co-examining the role of perceived school goal structures and parent goals during adolescence. Learning and Individual Differences,19, 53–60. Gonida, E. N., Karabenick, S. A., Makara, K. A., &Hatzikyriakou, G. (2014). Perceived parent goals and student goal orientations as predictors of seeking or not seeking help: Does age matter? Learning and Instruction, 33, 120-130. Gonzalez-DeHass, A. R., Willems, P. P., & Doan Holbein, M. F. (2005). Examining the relationship between parental involvement and student motivation. Educational Psychology Review, 17, 99–123. doi:10.1007/s10648-005-3949-7 Hulleman, C. S., Barron, K. E., Kosovich, J. J., &Lazowski, R. A. (2015). Student motivation: current theories, constructs, and interventions within an expectancy-value framework. In A. Lipnevich, F., Preckel, & R. Roberts (Eds.), Psychosocial skills and school systems in the Twenty-first century: Theory, research, and applications.Springer. Karabenick, S. A., & Berger, J.-L. (2013). Help seeking as self-regulated learning strategy. In H. Bembenutty, T. Cleary, & A. Kitsantas (Eds.), Applications of self-regulated learning across diverse disciplines: A tribute to Barry J. Zimmerman (pp. 237-261). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. Lazowski, R. A., &Hulleman, C. S. (2015). Motivation Interventions in Education: A Meta-Analytic Review. Review of Educational Research, XX, 1 –39. Martin, L., & Halpern, D. (2011). Pedagogy for developing critical thinking in adolescents: Explicit instruction produces greater gains. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 6, 1-13. Metallidou, P., &Vlachou, A. (2010). Children’s self-regulated learning profile in language and mathematics: The role of task value beliefs. Psychology in the Schools, 47, 776-788. Metallidou, P. (2012). Epistemological beliefs as predictors of self-regulated learning strategies in middle school students. School Psychology International, 34(3), 283-298. Ryan, A. M., Pintrich, P.R., &Midgley, C. (2001). Avoiding seeking help in the classroom: Who and why? Educational Psychology Review, 13, 93–114. Schwinger, M., &Stiensmeier-Pelster, J. (2011). Prevention of self-handicapping – The protective function of mastery goals. Learning and Individual Differences, 21, 699-709. Senko, C., Hulleman, C. S., &Harackiewicz, J. M. (2011). Achievement goal theory at the crossroads: Old controversies, current challenges, and new directions. Educational Psychologist. DOI: 10.1080/00461520.2011.538646 Urdan, T. & Mestas, M. (2006).The goals behind performance goals.Journal of Educational Psychology, 98, 354-365. Urdan, T., &Midgley, C. (2003). Changes in the perceived classroom goal structure and pattern of adaptive learning during early adolescence. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 28, 524–551. doi:10.1016/S0361-476X(02)00060-7 Vauras, M., Salonen, P., Lehtinen, E., &Lepola, J. (2001). Long-term development of motivation and cognition in family and school contexts. In S. Volet& S. Jarvela (Eds.), Motivation in learning contexts: Theoretical advances and methodological implications (pp. 295–315). Oxford, UK: Pergamon. Wigfield, A., & Eccles, J. S. (2000).Expectancy–value theory of achievement motivation.Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 68–81 Wigfield, A., & Cambria, J. (2010). Students’ achievement values, goal orientations and interest: Definitions, development and relations to achievement outcomes. Developmental Review, 30, 1-35.
Last Update
22-03-2017